One Room Challenge | Week 3

Garage Edition

Welcome to Week 3 of the Better Homes & Gardens One Room Challenge. For those of you who are new here, I am a guest participant in the One Room Challenge and I am renovating my garage. This week had a slight halt due to Bronchitis, but I’m starting to feel better and kicking it into high gear to accomplish my goals for the week! Goals for the week include:

  • Painting the cabinets
  • Add hardware to cabinets
  • Cut and install countertop
  • Having my logo installed (Already done, refer to above picture!)
  • Install trim
  • Install PRX performance system if arrives in time (Was supposed to be delivered Friday but is delayed now)
  • Finish painting the walls
  • Install End panel, trim, and toe kick on Cabinets

Friday night, I had a burst of energy and got the cabinet end panel cut and installed. You know what’s missing in the image below? Safety gear! This is a good opportunity to chat about what you should be using when working with saws, yes even a jigsaw.

Safety First

  1. Hair should be pulled back
  2. I should be wearing safety goggles, glasses are not sufficient for stopping sawdust or pieces of wood from flying into your eyes
  3. Ear protection
  4. Mask. Seasoned woodworkers would advise you to wear a properly fitted, high efficiency respirator so you can decrease your chances of developing respiratory problems or certain types of cancer.
  5. Fitted clothing (loose fitted clothing can easily become entangled in a power tool
  6. Gloves are used when handling wood but not advised when near rotating blades and other machinery parts where gloves can catch
  7. Protective footwear

Cabinets and Hardware

Then, I finished painting the cabinets and added the hardware. The painting process was easy, as these cabinets were unfinished. I should use a primer but I just used a paint that had paint and primer in one. Believe it or not, I only needed to apply two coats, without a primer and all! I did spray it down with a clear satin polycrylic spray. If you use this product, please be sure to be in a well ventilated area.

There was a slight hiccup with the hardware. Two of the handles weren’t installing level and drove me mad, so I filled in the holes with wood filler and started over. Do you ever have that problem, where you just can’t get it right? It ended up working out, I just had to keep trying.

My focus face, this handle was not going in easy!
You can see I struggled on the middle drawer as well. That’s wood filler you’re seeing (Insert Face Palm)

Don’t worry, I sanded it down and painted over it and you can’t even tell now that I had an oops! Its not a DIY if there isn’t at least one oops involved. Backtracking for a second… Did you see that GIANT sign above?? Southern Oregon Signs made and installed that for me! I promise it looks better in person. Unfortunately for my picture quality, I have a toddler and most of my DIYs happen during nap time and bed time, when low light is an issue. It’s pretty crazy seeing something you created up on the wall like that. 

Plan of Attack

I plan on finishing up the painting next so I can get rid of all of these paint trays and drapes and then starting on the trim work. Once the trim work is done, I’ll tackle the countertop. I’ve been waiting for him to have a day off to help me out because its a bit too heavy for me to hold and cut by myself. Plus, with the cabinets being installed on an L shape, I’ll need to make a miter cut, which I’ve never done with counters before. EEK! I’m going to try to make a template first to cut from so if I make a mistake the first time, I’m not ruining an expensive piece.

I’m hoping the PRX gym system arrives before week 4 starts because I was planning on devoting week 4 to my work bench build. I got my plans for this build from my friend Ben, his instagram handle is: @Bens_diy. He has a highlight bubble that shows you step by step, how to build this!

One Room Challenge Link

I’ll go over how the countertop install went when I get there. In the meantime, check out the other Guest participants and featured designers for the Fall Better Homes & Gardens One Room Challenge. There are some pretty incredible designs and DIYs happening over there!

Have questions? Reach out here!

Disclaimer

Please use proper safety precautions and do appropriate research when attempting projects. You are responsible for your own safety.

DIY Aged Bench

This aged bench was a fun weekend project and is an easy woodworking project for beginners! The best part is, because it is meant to look aged, it doesn’t have to be perfect!

Material List: I used select pine for this project

  • 1: 2 x 12 x 8
  • 1: 2 x 4 x 8
  • 1: 2 x 2 x 4 hobby board
  • I did not use this, but you can add a 2 x 4 or 2 x 2 on the bottom as well
  • 2 1/2″ pocket screws or 3″ wood screws (Depending on how you are securing it)
  • Wood glue, I used Titebond
  • Wire brush attachment

Cut List:

  • I wanted my bench to fall short of my king sized bed so I cut my 2 x 12 to 60″
  • Legs: 2 x 4 cut parallel at a 10 degree beveled angles x 4 (Shown in image A)
  • I wanted a total height of 20 inches ( the 2 x 12 is actually 1.5″) so cut the legs at 18.5″
  • Once assembled, I determined where I wanted my 2 x 2 support to be placed and cut them perpendicular at 10 degrees
A: Ends bevel cut and parallel. These should be flush so the bench does not wobble.

Leg Placement

Next, after completing your cut list, you’ll then want to determine leg placement on your seat part of the bench (the 2 x 12 x 60). You can refer to images below for placement. For my bench, I placed my legs 8″ in from the ends and 2″ in from the sides. Use your speed square to ensure they are straight. (Ignore my disaster of a garage please)

Securing the Legs

Next, determine how you want to secure your legs to your bench. I decided to use pocket holes but you can screw in from the top of the bench into the legs. I just didn’t want screw holes on the top of my bench. Mark off where you are placing the legs using your straight edge or speed square.

Remember, I went 8 inches in from the ends and 2 inches in from the sides (image B). I then used my kreg jig to create pocket holes on the insides of the legs (image C). Finally, I used wood glue at the points where the wood was contacting wood (image D).

Image B
Image C
Image D

Then, I secured the legs with my pocket screws (Image E). One thing I love about kreg jig, is they make it fool proof. The screws that come with kreg jigs have a guide on the bottom of the box to help you determine what size you will need. They recommended for a depth of 1 1/2″ to use 2 1/2″ pocket screws. You can refer to image F below. Be sure to wipe away any excess glue.

Image E
Image F

Placing the Support Bar

Once all four legs have been secured, you can determine placement of your support bars. I held up my 2 x 2 against the legs with firm pressure with a level on top and just eyeballed where I wanted it to go. I marked the inside of the 2 x 2, making sure it stayed level and in place (image G). I’m sure there are better and more mathematical ways to approach this, but I’m terrible at math and this worked out just fine. Plus, its aged guys, it doesn’t need to be perfect!

Securing the Support Bar

One tip to remember though, if your legs are at 10 degrees, the support will be at 10 degrees 😉. Cut your support perpendicular, or just follow your marks. Once cut, use this as a guide for your second support. Measure exactly where this will be secured and mark all four of your legs. Secure the supports with wood glue and 2 1/2″ or 3″ wood screws. Be sure to make pilot holes to avoid spitting the wood!

Image G
I used 3″ trim nails to secure my support bars. I didn’t have what I needed on hand.

Sanding

After everything is secured, make sure to wipe up any excess glue and let cure for at least 24 hours. I then used my jig saw and a wire brush attachment to rough up my bench (Images below). When I finished the aging process, I sanded it all down using a progression of 80 grit, then 120 grit, then 220 grit sandpaper (The lower number will have more grit, the higher the number, the smoother your grit will be).

Higher grit sandpaper is for sanding out deep scratches/grooves. If you use high grit sandpaper, you will need to progress slowly to a smoother grit (Higher number) to smooth the wood out thoroughly.

Stain

Wipe your bench down well after sanding to make sure there is no dust or debris left before staining and sealing. Now for the stain, I used a mixture of Minwax Driftwood and Weathered Oak to get the aged look that I was going for. I ended up doing two coats and letting it dry completely. Please make sure to wear a mask and do this in a well ventilated area to limit inhalation of the fumes.

Sealing

Once my bench was dry, I sealed it with Minwax Wipe-On Poly with a clear satin finish. To use this product, use a cloth (make sure it doesn’t lint) to wipe on the product. Using a cloth will help prevent drips or brush marks. This is fast drying and typically is dry within two hours. Once the first coat is dry, lightly sand with 220-grit sandpaper. Remove the dust and then apply the finish. You’ll want to apply at least two coats to achieve that even sheen.

And that is it folks! Are you ready to go build your own DIY aged bench? If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out by clicking here! Love this? Be sure to tell me in the comments below!

Disclaimer

Please use proper safety precautions and do appropriate research when attempting projects. You are responsible for your own safety.

One Room Challenge | Master Bedroom Week 4

So far, this week has not been nearly as productive with this room as last week was. But, progress is progress, right?!? I did manage to finish painting the bed and got all of the joint compound and paint off of the floor. Who out there do I send straight into a panic attack with my messy painting habits? 😅 Honestly, if I didn’t have my steam mop to fix all of my mistakes, I would be more careful. I have never been one to take my time and prep the area before starting 😬. Call it lazy if you want but when I get motivated, I just jump right in and go for it.

Besides painting the bed and cleaning up a horrendous mess 👇🏽

I did manage to take down the headache of a chandelier and returned it. I am ordering a new (different) chandelier for this room. I did learn that there is some logic to picking out a light fixture with consideration to size. What you want to do is add together the length and width of your room in feet and the sum is your total diameter in inches (This room is 16 ft x 18 ft) so, 16 + 18 = 34. My chandelier’s maximum diameter for this room should be 34 inches… This chandelier pictured above was 47 inches! It just made the room look off balance and I was NOT liking it.

My plans for this weekend include cleaning the garage so that I can finally finishing building up the bed into a poster bed and build a bench to go in front of the bed. I am using the plans by Nicole @hillhousediaries has in her highlights. It is adorable and I think will really tie this look together.

Nicole’s bench @hillhousediaries
My poster bed build plans

Be sure to check out all of the other incredible men and women guest participants and featured designers for the #oneroomchallenge! http://www.oneroomchallenge.com/orc-blog.