DIY Aged Bench

This aged bench was a fun weekend project and is an easy woodworking project for beginners! The best part is, because it is meant to look aged, it doesn’t have to be perfect!

Material List: I used select pine for this project

  • 1: 2 x 12 x 8
  • 1: 2 x 4 x 8
  • 1: 2 x 2 x 4 hobby board
  • I did not use this, but you can add a 2 x 4 or 2 x 2 on the bottom as well
  • 2 1/2″ pocket screws or 3″ wood screws (Depending on how you are securing it)
  • Wood glue, I used Titebond
  • Wire brush attachment

Cut List:

  • I wanted my bench to fall short of my king sized bed so I cut my 2 x 12 to 60″
  • Legs: 2 x 4 cut parallel at a 10 degree beveled angles x 4 (Shown in image A)
  • I wanted a total height of 20 inches ( the 2 x 12 is actually 1.5″) so cut the legs at 18.5″
  • Once assembled, I determined where I wanted my 2 x 2 support to be placed and cut them perpendicular at 10 degrees
A: Ends bevel cut and parallel. These should be flush so the bench does not wobble.

Leg Placement

Next, after completing your cut list, you’ll then want to determine leg placement on your seat part of the bench (the 2 x 12 x 60). You can refer to images below for placement. For my bench, I placed my legs 8″ in from the ends and 2″ in from the sides. Use your speed square to ensure they are straight. (Ignore my disaster of a garage please)

Securing the Legs

Next, determine how you want to secure your legs to your bench. I decided to use pocket holes but you can screw in from the top of the bench into the legs. I just didn’t want screw holes on the top of my bench. Mark off where you are placing the legs using your straight edge or speed square.

Remember, I went 8 inches in from the ends and 2 inches in from the sides (image B). I then used my kreg jig to create pocket holes on the insides of the legs (image C). Finally, I used wood glue at the points where the wood was contacting wood (image D).

Image B
Image C
Image D

Then, I secured the legs with my pocket screws (Image E). One thing I love about kreg jig, is they make it fool proof. The screws that come with kreg jigs have a guide on the bottom of the box to help you determine what size you will need. They recommended for a depth of 1 1/2″ to use 2 1/2″ pocket screws. You can refer to image F below. Be sure to wipe away any excess glue.

Image E
Image F

Placing the Support Bar

Once all four legs have been secured, you can determine placement of your support bars. I held up my 2 x 2 against the legs with firm pressure with a level on top and just eyeballed where I wanted it to go. I marked the inside of the 2 x 2, making sure it stayed level and in place (image G). I’m sure there are better and more mathematical ways to approach this, but I’m terrible at math and this worked out just fine. Plus, its aged guys, it doesn’t need to be perfect!

Securing the Support Bar

One tip to remember though, if your legs are at 10 degrees, the support will be at 10 degrees 😉. Cut your support perpendicular, or just follow your marks. Once cut, use this as a guide for your second support. Measure exactly where this will be secured and mark all four of your legs. Secure the supports with wood glue and 2 1/2″ or 3″ wood screws. Be sure to make pilot holes to avoid spitting the wood!

Image G
I used 3″ trim nails to secure my support bars. I didn’t have what I needed on hand.

Sanding

After everything is secured, make sure to wipe up any excess glue and let cure for at least 24 hours. I then used my jig saw and a wire brush attachment to rough up my bench (Images below). When I finished the aging process, I sanded it all down using a progression of 80 grit, then 120 grit, then 220 grit sandpaper (The lower number will have more grit, the higher the number, the smoother your grit will be).

Higher grit sandpaper is for sanding out deep scratches/grooves. If you use high grit sandpaper, you will need to progress slowly to a smoother grit (Higher number) to smooth the wood out thoroughly.

Stain

Wipe your bench down well after sanding to make sure there is no dust or debris left before staining and sealing. Now for the stain, I used a mixture of Minwax Driftwood and Weathered Oak to get the aged look that I was going for. I ended up doing two coats and letting it dry completely. Please make sure to wear a mask and do this in a well ventilated area to limit inhalation of the fumes.

Sealing

Once my bench was dry, I sealed it with Minwax Wipe-On Poly with a clear satin finish. To use this product, use a cloth (make sure it doesn’t lint) to wipe on the product. Using a cloth will help prevent drips or brush marks. This is fast drying and typically is dry within two hours. Once the first coat is dry, lightly sand with 220-grit sandpaper. Remove the dust and then apply the finish. You’ll want to apply at least two coats to achieve that even sheen.

And that is it folks! Are you ready to go build your own DIY aged bench? If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out by clicking here! Love this? Be sure to tell me in the comments below!

Disclaimer

Please use proper safety precautions and do appropriate research when attempting projects. You are responsible for your own safety.

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